International Photographic Competition Results Are In… Gold Again!

We at Ed Cooley Fine Art Gallery are so excited and proud to announce that Ed has been awarded the “Gold Photographer Award” by the Professional Photography Association For the second year in a row.  The award is recognition for outstanding achievement in the International Photographic Competition and we want to congratulate Ed on his hard work! Please enjoy the following photographs and follow the links to see more on our website. Thank you Ed for all you do and THANK YOU readers, collectors, clients and fellow nature lovers for supporting our passion to bring beauty to so many lives!

image“Morning Glory” Mt. Rainier National Park

“When photographing I wake up day after day dreaming about mornings like this. I could hardly believe my eyes as Mt Rainier was gloriously bathed in one of the most beautiful sunrise displays I have witnessed.”

Eilean Donan Castle“Dreams of Scotland”

“Eilean Donan Castle is one of the most recognised castles in Scotland, and probably appears on more shortbread tins and calendars than any other. It is, without doubt, a Scottish icon and certainly one of the most popular visitor attractions in the Highlands.”

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“Spring Eternal”

“Nestled up to the edge, I snapped this photo. I felt honored to have found this place of pure relaxation. I sat there for awhile observing this natural spa. Refreshed and hiking out I felt younger than I have in years.”

image1“Dolce Vita”

This vibrant image of Venice captures everything loved by locals and visitors alike. The beauty of the location and intensity of the colors elicit an immediate emotional response of dreams and desire to be a part of the image.                                                                       *Photo is set for release in November, 2015

Once again, Congratulations Ed and Thank You! Be sure to stay tuned as we announce more of the pieces awarded and click on the links for more information about the winning photographs.

 

 

Tip of the Day: Head for Nasty Weather

Summertime - Tuscany

In last weeks “Tip of the Day” I showed you an incredible mountain scene in the Rockies photographed with an iPhone 6! The great color and drama in that photograph was a three day thunderstorm moving in from the Southwest.

Notice the outdoor photographs that really impress you; they’ll have one thing in common — dramatic skies!  Clear blue, hazy, summer days are great for a sun tan but the light is so flat and boring your photographs won’t inspire.  Spend that time touring with your family or scouting locations for the next storm front to move your way.

Without a doubt, my favorite conditions are when stormy weather is moving into or exiting an area.  That special light just before the storm cuts loose makes everything so colorful and surreal that people won’t believe the scene “actually” looked like that.  Outdoor photographers spend more time waiting for the light than you can imagine. Sunrise and sunset make wonderful photographs but take a hot and muggy summer day with huge boomers building up and you can really get the magic happening.

Now when a photographer talks about “Light”, it’s not just light he is referring to.  It’s the whole combination of lighting, weather and conditions that is make up the magic sauce we use to create compelling photographs.

Don’t pay attention to those who tell you not to photograph in the middle of the day.  With the right conditions and technique some of your favorite photographs are just waiting on you – right in the middle of a hot summer afternoon!  Also learn to read the weather forecasts for your area paying special attention to fronts as they move through.  In many cases the day before they hit will be your best time to snag a keeper with beautiful color and skies.

The Beauty of Black & White: “The Tree”

“The Tree” taken in Tuscany, winner of the Best Photo Piece of the 2014 Arkansas PPA  that captures a truly amazing scene in nature visible by Google Earth. The colorful image depicts a lone tree on a hillside with clouds moving overhead, but what happens when we alter to black and white?

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B&W photography is all about emotion, texture and shapes. Without color, the viewer focuses on entirely different elements such as the commanding position of the tree on the hill, the texture of the wheat and the dramatic movement of the clouds. Also, by removing color, any context or bias associated with the color is gone. You as the viewer are forced to look deeper into the photograph and see the emotion.

The beauty of emotion is the intensely personal relationship formed between the viewer and the piece; some will see an intensely haunting image reminiscent of pain and sorrow while others will be brought to a private place of peace and serenity.

It’s up to you as the artist to introduce the viewer to the range of emotion that only black and white photography can deliver. So the question is: What do you see?

Must Love Trees

Trees

I think that I shall never see

A poem lovely as a tree.

A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the sweet earth’s flowing breast;

A tree that looks at God all day,
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;

A tree that may in summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;

Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain.

Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.

Joyce Kilmer